Revisiting Beer Can Chicken

Originally at: http://barbecuebible.com/2017/10/20/beer-can-chicken/

Recently, friends and I met up at a neighborhood eatery for an early dinner. Perusing the menu, I was delighted to see beer can chicken—this one served with carrot top chimichurri sauce. Sold. For me, beer can chicken is a sentimental favorite.

I actually owe my long working relationship with Steven to the dish. Back in the summer of 2002, he was on tour promoting his latest book, Beer-Can Chicken. Steven’s publisher, Workman, hired me the afternoon before his Ohio visit to handle food styling duties and drive him to local media and bookstore events, the first of which was occurring at 6 a.m. the following morning. Printed recipes in hand, I rushed to the supermarket to find the most comely-looking roasters they had, worthy beer, and the spices needed for Steven’s ever-popular All-Purpose Rub. I spent a sleepless night preparing for his live demos and barbecuing the “swap-outs,” i.e., the finished camera-ready chickens.

Though he literally wrote the book on the subject, Steven did not invent beer can chicken, sometimes called “chicken on a throne.” He was first introduced to it in 1996 at Memphis in May by a competition barbecue team called the Bryce Boar Blazers—though they didn’t claim credit for it, either, as it was already popular in Louisiana. Like nearly everyone, Steven was captivated by the wacky, indecorous technique. He explains it thus:

The idea is startlingly simple: You grill a chicken upright over an open can of beer. What results is the moistest, most succulent, and most flavorful chicken you’ve ever tasted.

Though some food writers have thrown shade on the technique recently, there really are benefits to barbecuing chicken (or turkey, duck, quail, or Cornish hens) this way:

• The vertical position facilitates even browning, crisp skin, and juicy meat without need of a rotisserie

• Excess fat drips off

• The legs and thighs are closer to the heat, meaning the dark meat can be cooked to a higher temperature (170 to 175 degrees) than the breast meat, which tends to dry out if overcooked

• Smoke (from wood chips or chunks) can circulate freely, subtly flavoring the bird

• It’s a conversation starter

The dish is also infinitely customizable—Beer-Can Chicken proved that—and once you have the basics down, it can be adapted to any barbecue culture. Jamaican jerk. Oaxacan mole. Chicken tikka or tandoori. Simply vary the rub, the marinade, or the beer or other liquid.

One of my favorite variations was a winner years ago in an extreme grilling contest sponsored by our website, barbecuebible.com. It was submitted by Louis Kiss, then (and maybe still) a special effects artist in California. It’s perfect for fall, and especially appropriate for Halloween parties; you still have time to audition it for the latter. To make it, follow the instructions for Steven’s basic beer can chicken, but use your favorite pumpkin beer or ale (if bottled, transfer to an empty beer or soda can) and the Pumpkin Spice Rub below.

Here are our tips for beer can chicken success:

• Buy organic or Certified Humane chickens. (For help in deciphering labels on poultry, click here)

• For more flavor and succulence, brine the chicken before cooking. Start with 1 gallon of water or other liquid, such as apple juice, and 1/2 cup of salt, adding aromatics (citrus peels, onion, whole spices, etc.) as desired. Cover and refrigerate for 8 to 12 hours.

• Do serve with an interesting sauce. For inspiration, see Sauces, Rubs, and Marinades.

• The recipe above directs you to pour half the beer out of the can before perching the chicken on it. Drink it, soak wood chips in it, or pour it in a shallow heatproof dish, like a pie tin, to maintain a moist environment in your grill or smoker.

• To avoid rubbery skin, smoke-roast the chicken at temperatures high enough (325 to 350 degrees) to render the fat. Add smoke with wood chips that you have previously soaked in water or other liquid, then drained.

• For stability on the grill grate, invest in a beer can chicken roaster. Otherwise, steady the chicken in a baking dish or disposable foil pan.

• Never roast a chicken on bottled beer (transfer to an empty can) or an unopened beer or soda can.

• To encourage even browning, rub the chicken all over with vegetable oil, olive oil, or melted butter before applying a barbecue rub.

• Once the chicken is positioned on the grill grate, plug the neck cavity with half a lemon, lime, or small onion. This helps retain moisture in the bird.

• For extra crisp skin, place the chicken, breast side up, on a wire rack over a rimmed baking sheet. Refrigerate, uncovered, for several hours.

• Insulated rubber gloves are a big help when transferring the chicken from the grill to a cutting board and extricating the steaming hot can.

• For a more professional-looking presentation, fold the wings behind the chicken before smoke-roasting.

PUMPKIN SPICE RUB:

1 1/2 tablespoons of prepared pumpkin pie spice
2 teaspoons sweet paprika
1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1 teaspoon coarse salt
1 teaspoon granulated sugar
1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg
Ground cayenne pepper to taste

Combine all the ingredients in a small bowl and mix with your fingers to break up any lumps. Makes enough rub to season one chicken.

Have a favorite beer can chicken recipe or tip? Tell us about it by leaving a comment here or tagging us on Facebook, Instagram, or Twitter.

The post Revisiting Beer Can Chicken appeared first on Barbecuebible.com.

Grilled Pork Steaks

Originally at: http://howtobbqright.com/2017/10/19/grilled-pork-steaks/

Grilled Pork Steak

Grilled Pork Steaks

This week I decided to do Grilled Pork Steaks, so I had my local butcher cut some “Extra-Thick” pork steaks from a fresh Boston Butt. (Shout out to Brad at The Butcher’s Block in Southaven, MS).

If you haven’t tried Grilled Pork Steaks, I suggest you get to your local meat market or butcher and pick up a few. Pork Steaks are excellent on the grill and these thick-cut versions are hearty enough for the biggest appetite!

I start out by seasoning each side of the pork steaks with a little Killer Hogs AP Rub (you can use any all purpose seasoning or just Salt, Black Pepper, and Garlic) followed by a generous layer of Killer Hogs The BBQ Rub (use your favorite rubs here – make this recipe your own). Just let them hang out on the counter while you get the grill going.

I’m firing up the PK 360 for this cook, but you can use any grill set up the same way for these Grilled Pork Steaks.

Start with a chimney full of hot charcoal and spread the coals out evenly across the front and back of the grill; add about a chimney of unlit coals down the center. This way the grill will have even heat throughout the whole cook.

You can also add a couple chunks of your favorite wood (I’m using Grillewood Cherry Wood) to the hot coals for some smoke flavor.

To slow the grilling process down, I use a raised cooking grate. This creates a little distance from the hot coals and allows the steaks longer time in the smoke. Place the pork steaks on the raised grate and cook them for about 20 minutes then flip and repeat.

By this time the outside should start to turn a little dark. Remove them from the grill and wrap. I use a sheet of aluminum foil with 2 Tablespoons of butter and a good drizzle of honey over the top. Close the foil up tight and get them back on the grill.

This step tenderizes the pork steaks and keeps them from getting too dark. Use a good probe thermometer and monitor the internal temperature. It should be 190-195⁰.

Once temp is reached remove the steaks from the grill (careful because they’re hot) and sit the raised grate to the side. I then added my Grill Grates over the hot coals and gave it time to get hot.

Carefully unwrap each pork steak and brush the outside with a good sauce. I’m using my new Killer Hogs Vinegar Sauce; pretty dang proud of this one! Place each pork steak on the grill grates and cook each side about 4 minutes to get a good char on the outside.

They’re done at this point and after a short 5 minute rest, ready to serve. You can really taste the grill flavor and the vinegar sauce goes nice with the richness of the pork.

My favorite part is the crispy-soft, charred fat along the outer edge. Give it a try and let me know what you think!

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Grilled Pork Steaks

Grilled Pork Steaks

Ingredients

4 Pork Steaks 1 ¼” thick

¼ cup Killer Hogs The AP Rub

¼ cup Killer Hogs The BBQ Rub

1 stick Salted Butter divided into 8 pcs

¼ cup Honey

8oz Killer Hogs Vinegar Sauce

Instructions

Prepare charcoal grill, PK 360 or other type grill for direct grilling. Divide hot charcoal evenly across front and back and place unlit charcoal down middle. Place 2 chunks of cherry wood over hot coals for smoke flavor.

Season the outside of each pork steak with AP Rub followed by The BBQ Rub (substitute your favorite seasonings if you wish).

Place the pork steaks on a raised rack a few inches above the cooking grate. Cook on both sides for 20 minutes each or until the outside begins to darken.

Place pork steaks individually on a sheet of aluminum foil and top with 2 pcs (2 Tablespoons) of butter and a drizzle of honey. Wrap completely in foil and return pork steaks to the raised cooking rack.

Continue to cook until internal temperature reaches 190-195⁰ about 30 minutes.

Carefully unwrap each pork steak and brush each side with Vinegar Sauce.

Remove the raised rack from the grill and place steaks directly on grill grate to sear each side (about 4 minutes ea. Side) Serve with additional vinegar sauce for dipping.

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Grilled Pork Steaks

Grilled Pork Steaks is a post from How to BBQ Right.

How to Secure Your Grill Against Theft

Originally at: https://grillingwithrich.com/secure-grill-theft/

How to Secure Your Grill Against Theft

How to Secure Your Grill Against Theft

 

You’ve just purchased a new grill, gotten it all set up outside on your deck, and turned in for the evening. In the morning, you take your cup of coffee out to admire your new prize, but it’s nowhere to be found.

This scenario may seem a little exaggerated, but grill theft is a very real phenomenon. By securing your grill and outdoor furniture, you can greatly decrease the odds of having outdoor possessions stolen. Physical security devices, neighbors, and even household pets can help ensure your grill’s safety.

Physical Security

If you prefer a more DIY approach, padlocks, steel cables, and even bicycle locks can be used to fashion homemade locking systems for your grill. Make sure to fasten it to something sturdy like the side of your house, the concrete, decking, or even outdoor furniture (depending on weight and stability). Even mounting rows of carpet tacks along the top can be an effective deterrent — although they might end up deterring you, too.

Security cameras are always an option for protecting your possessions; ADT home security cameras are known to be top of the line. Your neighbors may even want to go in on cameras together if the range is larger than one yard by itself. Motion sensor flood lights can also help stop a potential burglar in their tracks.

If you have several items you’re concerned about securing in your backyard, it may be worth taking an additional precaution by installing a tall privacy fence. Burglars are less likely to steal what they can’t see.

Friendly Neighbors

Going out of town? Find a trusted house sitter to check in on your place periodically. Have a conversation with the neighbors; let them know you’ll be gone and ask them to be especially diligent about keeping an eye open. Let them know if they don’t already that you would be happy to do the same for them. Forming social ties helps keep a community close, as well as guards the entire neighborhood against theft.

Pets

Do you happen to have large furry family members with a penchant for barking? Let your dogs out at night and accompany them outside to send a clear message to any neighborhood visitors know not to mess with your property. You may even like to post signs that warn against your furry friends, or simply place firm warning signs like, “No Trespassing,” or “Intruders Will Be Shot” (if legal).

However you choose to protect your grill and caution against theft. If a sneaky thief does somehow manage to get around your security, know that you can always report stolen property to the police, and fill out a report. A diligent community is the best prevention against criminal activity.

The post How to Secure Your Grill Against Theft appeared first on .

3 Reasons to Upgrade to a Thermapen

Originally at: https://grillingwithrich.com/3-reasons-upgrade-thermapen/

Thermapen Color Wheel - Digital Thermometer

I would like to thank the great people at Thermoworks for allowing me to re-publish this great article!

Thermoworks hopes you have loved owning and using your ThermoWorks ThermoPop®. Many people tell Thermoworks it can be a life-changing experience to start paying attention to the temperatures of their food with a fast and accurate instrument like the ThermoPop in their hands. Nothing has more of an impact on the quality and safety of food than the careful control of temperature. Arguably, little else has as much impact on the quality of your life than the quality and safety of your food.

Here are three important reasons why you should upgrade your traditional thermometer to the amazing Thermapen:

Thermapens® use a professional-grade thermocouple sensor, rather than the more common thermistor sensor in your ThermoPop. Thermocouples are faster and more accurate than thermistors.Your Thermapen actually comes with a NIST-traceable calibration certificate certifying its performance.Thermocouples are also more resistant to both physical and thermal shock. That means that if you drop your thermometer (or touch the probe tip to a flame or coal) your ThermoPop is much more likely to be damaged than your Thermapen. And if your Thermapen is damaged…
Thermapens can be recalibrated and repaired. While both products carry the Thermoworks full 2-year warranty against defects in either components or workmanship, only the Thermapen can be inexpensively recalibrated and repaired following that warranty period
Thermapens have a folding probe. This little innovation not only makes the Thermapen remarkably convenient to store and use, it also means the probe is much less likely to be bent or broken while not in use. You can even buy a magnetic heat and shock-resistant silicone boot for your Thermapen. Thermapens last and last. It’s a one-time investment that pays dividends for years to come.

The post 3 Reasons to Upgrade to a Thermapen appeared first on .

Two “Must Have” Books for Your Barbecue Library

Originally at: http://barbecuebible.com/2017/10/17/two-must-have-books-for-your-barbecue-library/

Pitmaster: Recipes, Techniques & Barbecue Wisdom (Voyageur Press, 2017)

Most winning competition-level pitmasters keep their cards close to their vests, seldom revealing the secret strategies that consistently propel them to center stage (a “walk”) once the scoring’s complete.

Not these guys. They seem determined to spill the beans (barbecued, of course).

I first met the co-authors of Pitmaster, restaurateurs Andy Husbands and Chris Hall, in 2010 when they assisted me in preparing a live-fire feast for the crew of the USS Constitution in Boston Harbor. The previous year, their IQUE barbecue team won the Jack Daniel’s World Championship Invitational, the first New England team to win this prestigious title. (The 2017 contest will be held October 27-28 in Lynchburg, Tennessee.)

We had too much in common—like Boston and barbecue—not to stay in touch. Still, I was honored when Andy and Chris invited me to pen one of several essays and contribute a recipe to the book, beautifully photographed by Ken Goodman. (I shared one of my favorites, Caveman T-Bones with Hellfire Hot Sauce.)

Pitmaster takes a “walk-before-you-run” approach. Chapter 1 focuses on backyard barbecue, essential techniques—such as using a chimney starter and setting up a 2-zone fire—and simple but classic recipes on familiar grills and smokers. Memphis-Style Dry Rub Baby Back Ribs. Pulled pork with mustard-based Gold Sauce optional. Smoked bologna.

Voyageur Press, 2017

But the pace quickens as the authors take you on a tour of regional North American barbecue styles. Represented are North Carolina (whole hog, Cheerwine barbecue sauce, and day drinking with bourbon and sweet tea); Kansas City (brisket or pork butt burnt ends, 3-2-1 St. Louis ribs); Texas (smoked brisket, beef ribs, and hot links); and ’que North of the Mason-Dixon line (Montreal smoked meat, cured Canadian bacon-like pork loin ham, and even an improbable mash-up of short ribs, brown butter, and lobster).

The final chapter is devoted to competition barbecue—a page turner that reveals why a pitmaster might spend $300 on a wagyu brisket when the top cash prize in the category is $250. Or spend a tedious evening scraping fat off the backside of chicken skin before packing for a long drive to the next contest.

Fascinating to me are the timelines, laid out with military precision, that accompany these award-winning recipes to ensure on-time turn-ins. The one for IQUE’S 180 Beef Brisket (180 being a perfect score in contests sanctioned by the Kansas City Barbecue Society) has a 2 a.m. start time and finishes at 1:30 p.m. Just reading the schedule is exhausting. This is also the first time I’ve seen a brisket recipe that includes injections of beef-flavored sodium phosphate, little known to the backyard barbecuer, but common in competition cooking.

Voyageur Press, 2017

In addition to smoked meat-centric dishes, Pitmaster includes great sounding sides, cocktails, and desserts. (Who wouldn’t be intrigued by tiramisu built with Twinkies instead of ladyfingers?) Though I would likely do it on the grill in a cast-iron skillet, Cornbread with Butter, Honey, and Sea Salt sounds like a crowd-pleaser, a great dish for fall.

Bottom line: Pitmaster is a terrific resource for barbecue aficionados of all skill levels.

Buxton Hall BBQ Book of Smoke: Wood-Smoked Meat, Sides, and More (Voyageur Press, 2016)

In my experience, cookbooks eponymously named after restaurants are often poor investments. You see a short stack of them at the front of the house—maybe they’re even autographed!—and influenced by the good vibe, indulgent food, and a cocktail or two, you impulsively add one to your bill. You never cook from it, and eventually cull it from your library.

Buxton Hall BBQ Book of Smoke is not one of those books. If you’re more than an armchair barbecuer, you’ll read this engaging book (part autobiography, part cookbook) cover to cover, eventually spatter it with vinegar-based Hog Sauce or melted lard, and plaster its pages with sticky notes. And you’ll certainly want to visit its namesake, installed in an atmospheric old skating rink in Asheville, North Carolina.

You might even contemplate the purchase of a pick-up truck in order to transport cinderblocks and masonry sand. And of course, whole hogs. Yes, inspired by the Buxton Hall BBQ Book of Smoke, things could quickly get out of hand.

Fortunately, author Elliott Moss believes barbecue is an egalitarian endeavor, a cooking method for the masses. No pit? No problem. He’s devoted a chapter to what he calls “quick smoking,” which involves one of two improvised devices and requires little in the way of equipment. (His restraint in the application of smoke is appealing.)

I was intrigued by the very portable smoker he built using an old-school Girl Scout mess kit and a handheld drill. Genius! And perfect for campers, fishermen, or backpackers. Detailed instructions are also included for a roomier tabletop smoker using two restaurant-style hotel pans—one perforated—and heavy-duty aluminum foil. Note: Unless you have a powerful blower above your stovetop, the author recommends using both of these smokers outdoors as they produce a lot of smoke.

Originally from South Carolina, Moss has a deep respect for the barbecue traditions of his childhood; many of the recipes in the book were inspired by family favorites. His tips for barbecuing a whole hog and serving it in its own crisped skin—a Carolina tradition—are reason enough to buy the Buxton Hall BBQ Book of Smoke. But his many years in the restaurant business give him the bona fides to suggest Pulled Turkey, ember-roasted vegetables, Smoked Grits and Gravy, or Smoked Pimento Cheese. Truthfully, not everything is smoked or barbecued, i.e., the gumbo-like Chicken Bog his grandparents used to make. Or Thanksgiving-worthy Cider Brussels Sprouts with Cracklins, moistened with Hog Stock.

Desserts get their own chapter, heavy on pies, including one that’s ubiquitous in the South, meringue-topped Banana Pudding Pie.

Definitely a keeper.

Have a favorite barbecue cookbook we should check out? Let us know by leaving a comment below or on Facebook, Twitter, or Instagram.

The post Two “Must Have” Books for Your Barbecue Library appeared first on Barbecuebible.com.

3 Reasons to Upgrade to a Thermapen

Originally at: http://grillingwithrich.com/3-reasons-upgrade-thermapen/

Thermapen Color Wheel - Digital Thermometer

I would like to thank the great people at Thermoworks for allowing me to re-publish this great article!

Thermoworks hopes you have loved owning and using your ThermoWorks ThermoPop®. Many people tell Thermoworks it can be a life-changing experience to start paying attention to the temperatures of their food with a fast and accurate instrument like the ThermoPop in their hands. Nothing has more of an impact on the quality and safety of food than the careful control of temperature. Arguably, little else has as much impact on the quality of your life than the quality and safety of your food.

Here are three important reasons why you should upgrade your traditional thermometer to the amazing Thermapen:

Thermapens® use a professional-grade thermocouple sensor, rather than the more common thermistor sensor in your ThermoPop. Thermocouples are faster and more accurate than thermistors.Your Thermapen actually comes with a NIST-traceable calibration certificate certifying its performance.Thermocouples are also more resistant to both physical and thermal shock. That means that if you drop your thermometer (or touch the probe tip to a flame or coal) your ThermoPop is much more likely to be damaged than your Thermapen. And if your Thermapen is damaged…
Thermapens can be recalibrated and repaired. While both products carry the Thermoworks full 2-year warranty against defects in either components or workmanship, only the Thermapen can be inexpensively recalibrated and repaired following that warranty period
Thermapens have a folding probe. This little innovation not only makes the Thermapen remarkably convenient to store and use, it also means the probe is much less likely to be bent or broken while not in use. You can even buy a magnetic heat and shock-resistant silicone boot for your Thermapen. Thermapens last and last. It’s a one-time investment that pays dividends for years to come.

The post 3 Reasons to Upgrade to a Thermapen appeared first on .

BBQ and Grilling News: July 7, 2017 Edition

Originally at: https://grillingwithrich.com/bbq-and-grilling-news-july-7-2017-edition/

Smoked BBQ Ribs with a Mop

Smoked BBQ Ribs with a Mop

Smoked BBQ Ribs with a Mop

Smoked BBQ Ribs with a Mop

Smoked BBQ Ribs with a Mop

Smoked BBQ Ribs with a Mop

Smoked BBQ Ribs with a Mop

Smoked BBQ Ribs with a Mop

Smoked BBQ Ribs with a Mop

Barbecue and Grilling News from around the world from the past week from July 7,  2017:

This Insane Cadillac BBQ Smoker is for Sale in Dallas 

To Make Your Stainless Steel Grill Last, Don’t Place It in These Locations

9.5 tips to scientifically enhance your grill game

Who Has the Right to Make Barbecue? via the New York Times

Celebrated Austin barbecue trailer La Barbecue moving indoors

 

Featured Recipe of the Week: 

Weber-Stephen Extreme Hamburger

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Weber’s Extreme Hamburger Recipe

  Hamburger Recipes, Main Course  Grilling {Hot and Fast}

July 7, 2017

Weber-Stephen Extreme Hamburger

Directions

1In a skillet over medium heat, fry the bacon until crisp, 10 to 12 minutes, turning occasionally. Drain on paper towels

2Whisk the mayo ingredients, including ¼ teaspoon salt and 1/8 teaspoon pepper

3Mash the guacamole ingredients, including ½ teaspoon salt and ¼ teaspoon pepper

4Mix the ground chuck with the Worcestershire sauce, 1 teaspoon salt, ½ teaspoon pepper, the smoked paprika, and onion powder, and then gently form eight patties of equal size, each about ½ inch thick and a little wider than the buns. Refrigerate the patties until ready to grill.

5Prepare the grill for direct cooking over medium-high heat (400° to 500°F).

6Grill the patties over direct medium-high heat, with the lid closed, until cooked to medium doneness (160°F), 6 to 8 minutes, turning once. During the last 30 seconds

7to 1 minute of grilling time, place a slice of cheese on each patty to melt, and toast the buns, cut side down, over direct heat.

8Build each burger on a bun with garlic mayo, a lettuce leaf, a tomato slice, two patties, as much guacamole as you like, a slice of bacon (torn in half), and more garlic mayo. Serve immediately

This is a great hamburger recipe from Weber’s Big Book of Burgers: The Ultimate Guide to Grilling Backyard Classics which Weber was nice to send me a copy of. This hamburger recipe is perfect for anytime of the year. I would suggest trying this recipe out!

Ingredients

4 Slices slices thick-cut bacon

2 Pounds ground chuck ((80% lean))

1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce

1/2 teaspoon smoked paprika

1/2 teaspoon onion powder

8 Thin slices cheddar cheese

4 hamburger buns

4 Leaves Boston lettuce

1 beef beefsteak tomato (cut crosswise into 4 slices about 1/2 inch thick)

Mayo

1/3 cup mayonnaise

1 teaspoon garlic (minced)

Kosher salt

Freshly ground black pepper

Guacamole

2 Ripe Hass avocados

1 tablespoon fresh lime juice

2 Teaspoons minced garlic

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00:00

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The post BBQ and Grilling News: July 7, 2017 Edition appeared first on .

BBQ and Grilling News: July 21, 2017 Edition

Originally at: https://grillingwithrich.com/bbq-and-grilling-news-july-21-2017-edition/

Here is the latest and greatest from around the world from the barbecue and grilling industry:

 

Want to Choose the Best Hot Dogs? Learn What the Labels Mean via New York Times
Health Canada assessing wire-bristle BBQ brush risks after 9 injury reports via CBC News
Gas or Charcoal: Which Grill Is Superior? via Mens’ Journal
Evidence grows linking grilled meat and cancer, but you can lower the risk via Washington Post
Weber Grills Celebrates 65 Years of Innovation via Weber Grills

 

Featured Recipe of the Week: 

Smoked Brisket Nachos

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Smoked Brisket Nachos

  Beef Dish, Beef Side Dishes, Side Dish  Smoking {Low and Slow}

July 21, 2017

Smoked Brisket Nachos

Directions

1After you smoke your brisket, cut the Omaha Steaks Smoked Brisket into 1/2 cubes.

2In a baking dish spread the corn tortilla chips.

3Sprinkle with the grated cheese then top with the smoked brisket.

4Place under oven broiler until cheese has melted.

5Sprinkle with 2 Tbsp. Pico De Gallo and 2 Tbsp. shredded lettuce.

6Serve with Guacamole, Sour Cream and Pico De Gallo on the side.

Pico de Gallo

1Combine all ingredients in a mixing bowl and mix well.

Guacamole

1Combine all ingredients in a mixing bowl and mix well.

Directions

1Preheat oven broiler

2Heat shredded Smoked Pork then spread evenly on the 2 tostadas flats

3Sprinkle with the grated cheese and place under oven broiler until cheese has melted

4Place nacho flats on a cutting board sprinkle with chopped cilantro and cut into quarters

5Arrange triangles on plate and mound shredded lettuce in the middle

6Place a scoop of pico de gallo, guacamole, and sour cream on the shredded lettuce

7Garnish with cilantro sprig and serve

Recipe provided by Omaha Steaks

Ingredients

2 Cups Corn Tortilla Chips – Thick Cut

6 oz Omaha Steaks Smoked Brisket

1/2 cup Grated Jack Cheese

1/2 cup Grated Cheddar Cheese

2 Tbsp Pico De Gallo

1/4 cup Shredded Lettuce

On the side:

1/4 cup Pico De Gallo

1/4 cup Guacamole

1/4 cup Sour Cream

Pico de Gallo

(makes 1-1/4 cup)

3/4 cup Roma Tomato (diced into 1/4″ pieces)

3 Tbsp. White Onion (1/4″ Dice)

1 Tbsp. Cilantro (Chopped very fine)

1 tsp Jalapenos (Minced very fine with the seeds)

1 tsp Lime Juice (Fresh Squeezed)

1/2 tsp Sea Salt

Guacamole

(makes 1 cup)

2 each Avocados, medium (Peeled, seeded and 1/2″ chop)

1 Tbsp Lime Juice, fresh

1/4 cup Pico De Gallo

1 tsp Garlic, minced

1 Tbsp Olive Oil

1/2 tsp Jalapeno, minced

1/2 tsp Sea Salt

– See more at: http://www.omahasteaks.com/recipe/smoked-brisket-nachos#sthash.fix4ntCB.dpuf

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Introducing TimeStack by Thermoworks

Originally at: https://grillingwithrich.com/introducing-timestack-by-thermoworks/

Introducing the brand new TimeStack by Thermoworks! I will be reviewing and rating this brand new product by the makers of the very popular Thermapen. Here is some information and details about this brand new product by Thermoworks.

About the TimeStack by Thermoworks

Set alarms quickly with numeric keypad without fiddling with up/down or scrolling buttons. Four distinct alarm sounds tell you what timer is alarming, or record your own voice-alarm for each channel and know exactly what’s done by name.

Big digits are legible from a distance. Stands upright on the counter or grips securely to a metal surface with strong magnets. Splash-proof IP65 design keeps internals dry around kitchen splashes. It’s time to toss your cheap, flimsy timer for a quality-built TimeStack.

Specs about TimeStick by Thermoworks

Countdown Range
99 hours 99 minutes 99 seconds

Countup Range
99 hours 99 minutes 99 seconds

Display Resolution
1 second

Time Accuracy
±1 second every 2 hours

Alarm Sound Level
About 100 dB at 11.8 inches (300 mm)

Alarm Volume Control
Adjustable in 4 steps and mute

Tones
1=2kHz, 2=1kHz, 3=500Hz

Water Resistance
IP65

Battery
9V x 1, included; 7,000 hours typical

Display Size
3.15 H x 2.17 W inches (80 H x 55 W mm)

Dimensions
6.6 H x 4.13 W x 2.4 D inches (168 H x 105 W x 60.8 D mm)

Operating Temperature
32 to 122°F (0 to 50°C)

 

TimeStick Thermoworks Picture

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